On kindness, Baltimore and Leonard Cohen

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Leonard Cohen

Leonard Cohen has passed away yesterday. I have celebrated by listening to his songs for an entire day. Yes, celebrated is the right word. In his last interview to New Yorker after his latest album You Want It Darker came up, he told that he was ready to go. He was 83 the day he did. And he had lived a full life. He mastered his song writing to the extent, that each song in his last album is an intimate conversation with the Creator. It’s divine.

There is too much to be told or guessed or speculated about his life, his women, his spirituality, but what matters the most, he was a man that felt. He felt life in impossibly deep ways, in impossibly profound ways, both love and hurt. He wrote songs that were so strikingly beautiful that every time vast sadness washes over you and yes, he was also struggling with depression, stage fright all his long life. The man that was so prone to depression and the man that could feel.

His “You Want it Darker” came up a month ago, as I was on my way to the United States. I listened to it all 24 hours on plane and transit. Then, I have not yet known, that Cohen will die in a month, nor I believed that Donald Trump will win the presidential elections, nor that some of my Muslim friends in the US will be afraid to wear hijabs for their safety the day after elections. The first day after the elections.

Today the world seems like a very sad place, where feeling is hurtful and evokes anger. As it did in the US. But a month ago, in Baltimore, in a small forest by the lake Ronald, I had one of my own most important spiritual moments in life, as I swore to feel and to live life deeply. Guided by my heart, inspired by Cohen’s authenticity. In hope that may be one day, I will create something as profound as Cohen did, in hope that I will never be as angry or devastated to vote for racist and sexist man. In hope that we all can do better.

“The days after” are indeed, sad, but I choose that day in Baltimore to influence me more than yesterday, the day Leonard Cohen has passed away or than the day Donald Trump has won or even than the day after. I choose to believe that we can feel deeply and remain kind at the same time.

 

 

 

 

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